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Iris Nelia Aranda

Iris Nelia Aranda

Iris Nelia Aranda is a Panamanian professional artist in oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, ink, ceramics, wood and metal sculpture, and photographs.

“All my figures, whether plants, animals, fruits, or human forms, reverberate in the depths of my starry, surreal skies. My soul is drawn to living lineal figures and natural cylindrical shapes. My colors fuse freshness, harmony and spontaneity -- the joy and rush of life in the natural world of animals, water and climate that flows from within me into my art”.

Born deaf, she experiences the earth visually. As a child, she basked in the beauty of the waves and sand on family treks to the oceanside. Her parents recalls her surprise and inspiration by the salty taste of seawater. So she began making drawings of the seaside. With encouragement from her family, she progressed through many areas of art, receiving her Masters of Applied Arts Design from the University of Panama in 1997.

Her greatest inspiration came from the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo in Panama City. There she found, not only a connection between her heart and the visual arts, but also support from the professional community. In the United States she has had the great pleasure of creating murals, sculpture and children’s workshops for schools such as the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, Milwaukee Sign Language Immersion School, Burroughs Junior High School, and Engleburg Elementary School. I have contracted privately to design corporate and home interiors, and have had the honor of several special gallery showings of my work.

Internationally, I have exhibited in Central America, South America, Cuba, and Europe. I am proud to have worked for UNESCO, OAS, and the CSD companies. Support and sales have ranged from private sector individuals to VSA, and IP-RELAY, Sprint VRS , and Sorenson VRS.

Chuck Baird

Chuck Baird

Chuck Baird was born as an early baby boomer with moderate hearing loss but grew up culturally Deaf in Kansas City area. He has been a painter since his teen years and has led a distinguished career, most notably as the official co-curator of Deaf Way II art exhibitions on and off campus in Washington, D.C. in 2002. He has served as artist in residency at over thirty five schools for the Deaf, has been involved with the National Theatre of the Deaf as an actor for ten years, has participated in dozen of group exhibits, and has been art commissioned many times. He is settling in Austin, Texas with his cat, Reggie.

http://chuckbaird.com

Beulah and Barb

Beulah Hester
and
Barbie Harris

Betty Taylor

Velda "Betty" Taylor

The 3 B’s, as they are affectionately known, are a trio of artists from Danville who work with stained glass. Barbie Harris, Beulah Hester and Betty Taylor are deaf and are involved with stained glass, a medium that is fascinating and challenging and sometimes frustrating – the glass, though spellbinding, also breaks. At one of the KSD bazaars they put together a booth of small works, mostly sun catchers. It was there that they came up with a logo "3-Bees", using the first initial of their names, “B”. They were offered a booth at the 1997 DeaFestival in Frankfort, but being still "green" to the idea of their work as profitable art, the booth was a bit overwhelming. It was, however, a learning experience for them in the gathering and sharing of information, suggestions, and the meeting of different deaf artists. In 1998 at the Deaf Artist Retreat at Open Ground they created a panel of glass entitled “Chaos and Serenity” as well as having the opportunity to see themselves as artist of their own right, not just three friends who made sun catchers for fun. Since then they have absorbed much from other artists, shared time together, become closer friends, and received orders for more of their work.

Melody Bock-Freeman

Melody Bock-Freeman

Melody Bock-Freeman graduated with a Master’s degree in Art Education and Secondary Education (MAEd) in 2006 and with graduate certification in Teaching the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in 2007 from Eastern Kentucky University. She is a certified Art Educator and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education for all grade levels with the Kentucky Professional Standards Board. She was born with severe to profound hearing loss and has a strong oral background. She served as a Service Provider Representative for KCDHH from June 30, 2007 until June 30, 2010. She is an active artist in her community as well as for the state of Kentucky. She is mentoring with the Ky Artist Roster for VSA arts and a member of the Lexington Art League. Ms. Bock-Freeman is currently teaching undergraduate Elementary Art Education courses at Eastern Kentucky University. Ms. Bock-Freeman currently resides in Lexington, Kentucky with her husband, Bruce Freeman.

www.orgsites.com/ky/melody

Jack Cochran and Bernice Woods

Jack Cochran
Bernice Wood

Jack Cochran

Jack Cochran’s art takes many forms, primarily oil painting, but also includes drawing, watercolor, print making and screen-print, woodcut and monotype. Jack is a late-deafened person; therefore, the language of art is his communication mode. It is his belief that there is no barrier to understanding a beautiful piece of art, whether it be a tonal study, vibrant floral work, portrait or landscape. At the age of 69, he recently graduated magna cum laude with a degree in art from the University of Kentucky.

 

Bernice Wood

Oil painting had always been her medium of use until 1990. All this changed when she enrolled in watercolor classes taught by Robert James Foose at the University of Kentucky. These informative classes continued for several years and added to her experience. She continued learning by participating in many workshops taught by prominent watercolor artists.

She currently instructs a University of Kentucky sponsored watercolor Osher Lifelong Learning Class. She also teaches a weekly Thursday evening class at Artists’ Attic and a yearly watercolor workshop for The Winchester Art Guild.

Her studio is located in Artists’ Attic in Victorian Square where she is a juried member and serves as president of the artist organization of twenty artists members.

Her watercolor paintings are on exhibit in her studio and can be seen daily during open hours. She welcomes and encourages visits to all Gallery Hops and scheduled member exhibits at Artists’ Attic. Her paintings can be seen at www.artists.attic.org.

Her art is now being shown at Artists Attic along with other gallery members. Recent art exhibits featuring her work were in August 2007 and 2008 Member Shows, Annual Plein Air Shows in October of 2007 and 2008; also in Christmas Shows held in November and December of 2007 and 2008 as well as previous years.

Theresa Coughlan

Theresa Coughlan

Born in Ashland, Oregon, which is famous for the Shakespeare Festival that has greatly influenced Theresa creatively. Theresa attended RIT for its Weaving and Textile Design at American School of the Crafts. Her first ASL quilt was created in 2004 and then some more were created in the next few years while she juggled with her graduate program and business. One day, she was invited to do a gallery showing at NTID, Theresa then created many ASL quilts in time for the showing which was successful (October 2009). She did two more showings in Sisters, Oregon. DeaFestival 2010 will be my fourth showing. Theresa is excited to make more ASL-related quilts as well as weaving Deaf experience into the quilt stories.

Michael Cross

Michael Cross

Michael Cross is a deaf artist who specializes in unique sculptures ranging from the whimsical to dark fantasy. He also does illustrations and cartoon work. His artwork can be viewed at www.mcrossart.com. Michael currently resides in Indianapolis with his wife, Evelyn and two children, Kayla and Daniel, who are budding artists in their own right.

Julia Damon

Julia Cameron Damon

"When I became deaf at age 19 I realized that my interactions with the hearing world would never be the same. I found myself doing more and more portraits, as it afforded me calm one-on-one hours of getting to know and perceive the people I am fascinated with and care about. There was communication and knowing of the other on some deep cellular level that did not require the spoken word. As a romantic, I realized it is my tendency to canonize and exalt those who allow me to create after their image. I love the connectivity that comes from doing portraits as much as I do the art itself. Over the years, how I interact with the world at large and how I do my art have evolved and shifted. As a certified massage therapist, I started to see the beauty of each client and the possibility of the skin as canvas. As I started to meet people who were open to becoming living art, I was charmed by the realization that it was a whole other level of silent communication and communion between model and artist. The great abyss of misunderstanding and miscommunication seem to abate and diminish as the models and I create work of what I hope will be their truth and beauty.

As you look at my work you may wonder, “What is this about?” My hope would be to represent the fact that every person has their story, their complexity, their difficulties, and their gifts. I venture into the individuals’ shadowlands and interior in search of who they really are and what they can allow themselves to share. My goal is to reveal what is possible on the model’s skin. Politics and division, differing beliefs and opinions, linguistic knowledge and skill or the lack thereof all fall away as the true self is revealed.

The true self revealed is the ultimate in communication I seek. To create these works as a deaf artist, I am perceiving through the skin, energy, make-up, paint, intention, and the sheer determination that is fueled by love, respect, and the will to listen and represent. More often than not, I am left in awe of the human spirit and gratitude for what the models allow to manifest.

www.camroseartesinfinitae.com

Carrie French

Carrie French

Expression in her media is the window to her soul. It started one rainy day before she started school, her mother gave her a paper bag and she designed clothes/outfits with it. She used paper plates for shoes, yarn for laces and newspapers for hats. She has always been inventive with using her hands. She has not actually been into realism; instead she is more influenced by expressionist, pop art, and modern art. She loves being creative, it is its own driving force. She constantly tries to re-invent her work by going over it again with different media. As a lifelong learner of new techniques, inspirations, and perceptions she has come to the conclusion that there is no right way to draw from one's soul, just keep feeling, loving, and creating.

www.artistsites.org/carriesartwork

Gail Kirtz

Gail Kirtz

Gail Kirtz was born in Dundalk, MD and grew up in Ashland KY where she still lives. She has been a professional artist for twenty years. Her formal art education included fine art studies at The University of Kentucky, specializing in painting and 3-D design. She works in a variety of mediums. Her oil, acrylic and watercolor paintings, and mixed media collages have won over two hundred awards in regional and national juried and open shows. She is known for her richly colored landscapes and her expressionistic collages.

http://gail-kirtz.artistwebsites.com

Elaine Laird

Elaine Laird

Elaine is a graphic artist. The first time she showcased her greeting cards was at Deafestival 1996. At this time, Elaine displayed her work only and nothing was for sale. She did this to find out the kind of artwork potential customers liked. She was told that because she is hearing impaired and knows sign language, she should design artwork connected to deaf culture and language. She thought that was a great idea and decided that her goal should be to design artwork in American Sign Language.

She currently has a home based business which specializes in greeting cards. She sells her cards to family members, friends and acquaintances, as well as at local and regional events. She is happy to create unique artwork that deaf and hearing people would like to give to those they love.

She has an Associate’s degree in Commercial Art from the Jefferson Community and Technical College (formerly known as Jefferson Community College); and a Bachelor’s degree in Art with a concentration in Graphic Design from the University of Louisville.

Tony McGregor

Tony Landon McGregor

A lifelong Texan, Tony Landon McGregor was born in Garland on November 18, 1958. He became deaf when he was approximately 18 months old, from hereditary causes.

Strongly inspired by Southwestern Indian designs, especially the Mimbres drawings, Tony McGregor uses wood burning tools to etch the designs onto the gourd’s surface. His Southwestern Native American-styled gourds have been shown at many festivals in Texas and New Mexico. And many galleries in those two states, and in some on the Eastern Seaboard, carry Tony’s fine gourd artworks. Each is a unique, exquisitely handcrafted work of art.

“I am always involved in many things with my hands; I am constantly experimenting with art. My favorite medium is mixed media. For the last 20 years, I have traveled to West Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Utah, and those areas have greatly influenced my way of thinking. The most prominent artists who influenced me significantly are Georgia O’Keefe of New Mexico and, of course, Francisco de Goya of Spain. In addition, I have been surrounded by Native American friends living in the Southwest area and their culture and folklore are fascinating to me. I have been exploring juxtaposition as a concept in many of my artworks. To me, it means a unique blending of two cultures: the Native American culture and Deaf culture. This concept creates a new frontier called Southwestern DeVIA art. The works of art I have composed are extensions or dimensions of my artistic personality.”

Warren Miller

Warren Miller

Warren was raised in Cleveland, Ohio but the circumstances regarding his deafness are vague. His parents discovered he was deaf at five years of age, but his brother, who was seven years older, believed that he had meningitis.  While growing up, Warren was influenced by his father's and grandfather's artwork, and started to learn to draw. His dad always brought a small pad and pencil whenever he went, and encouraged Warren to draw and improve his skills.

In 1970, his dad passed away unexpectedly.  Warren became more focused on his art and started to experiment with different types of media such as oil, watercolor, chalk, pastel, colored pencils, and acrylics. Warren attended Rochester Institute of Technology in New York and upon graduation decided to pursue a career in graphic design. His first job was at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and then nine years later he went to the University of Nevada for a year, and then returned to Indianapolis to work for Marian College. After nine years of working at Marian College, he was hired by Wood-Mizer where he worked as an Art Director for eight years until the company downsized due to the recent economic turmoil.  Warren’s family and friends are encouraging him to pursue his passion to paint again and he is currently focusing on a series of paintings about deaf culture.

Dick Moore

Dick Moore

Born and raised in Louisville, KY, Dick graduated from Kentucky School for the Deaf in 1968. He then attended Gallaudet University for a few years, until he decided to become a printer and was hired at the Washington Post in D.C. Dick is married and has four grown children and two grandchildren. He retired a few years ago from the Washington Post and now enjoys traveling with his wife in their recreational vehicle. He also enjoys sailing, riding his Harley, and of course pursuing photography.

Dick has always been interested in cameras. He purchased his first Nikon when he was in college. He started by selling his photography as key chain viewers at deaf sports events such as AAAD. He is a professional freelance photographer doing a wide range of work from weddings and sports events to portraits, groups and he also works with the Deaflympics. His work has been published in various newsletters, the Washington Post newspaper, and many magazines. He is now exploring a different venue of photo work, by selling his photographs to the public.

Mindy Moore

Mindy Moore

Mindy Moore is a multi-talented entertainer who truly leaves a mark on the stage and on her art, batik tie-dye. She hand crafts beautiful dresses, scarves and shirts for children, adults and even your dog…you only have to ask her…

Mindy is extremely versatile, excelling as an actress, storyteller, poet, mime and visual artist. She currently teaches Art, Drama and Deaf Studies at the Texas School for the Deaf. She also directs school plays, gives workshops and is a full time mother to her two children. She and Theron, her husband, work together on stage performances and market DVDs depicting ASL Stories and Deaf Culture.

www.justmindy.com

Rebecca Reihm

Rebecca Reihm

Growing up, Rebecca was inspired by her uncle who was a professional photographer for the United States Marines. She honed her skills using a 35mm camera and developing film at Illinois School for the Deaf. During college, she purchased her first 35mm camera. Now armed with a digital camera, she pursues her interest in photography. She enjoys seeing the world through her Nikon camera and sharing the connections of the photographs.

www.flickr.com/photos/backorder

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